< back to main site

Publications

Between visit variability of thermal imaging of feet in people attending podiatric clinics with diabetic neuropathy at high risk of developing foot ulcers

Macdonald, A; Petrova, N; Ainarker, S; Allen, J; Lomas, C; Tang, W; Plassmann, P; Whittam, A; Bevans, J; Ring, F; Kluwe, B; Simpson, R; Rogers, L; Machin, G; Edmonds, M (2019) Between visit variability of thermal imaging of feet in people attending podiatric clinics with diabetic neuropathy at high risk of developing foot ulcers. Physiological Measurement, 40 (8). 084004 ISSN 1361-6579

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

People with diabetic neuropathy who have previously ulcerated are at high risk of reulceration. They should regularly attend podiatry clinics for surveillance and routine protective podiatric treatment. It has been suggested that inflammation prior to skin breakdown shows up as a hotspot on a thermal image even in the absence of clinical signs. The aim of this study is to quantify inter-patient and intra-patient thermal variations presented by diabetic feet at high risk of ulceration.
Approach: Whole foot and spot temperatures were recorded for 96 patients who attended two successive podiatry appointments without ulceration 28 [28, 31] days apart, median [interquartile range]. This was a part of a longer study into whether thermal imaging in clinic can reduce the rate of re-ulceration. Main results: The variation in spot temperature right/left differences for single patients between visits was comparable to the variation observed between patients (0.8 [0.3, 1.5] °C compared with 0.9 [0.4, 1.7] °C). Similarly, whole foot temperature variation for a single patient between visits was comparable to the variation observed between patients (0.6 [0.2, 1.1] °C compared with 0.8 [0.2, 1.3] °C). Significance: Thresholds which depend on thermal differences from visit to visit are unlikely to have sufficient specificity to effectively target treatment designed to prevent the development of foot ulcers.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Diabetes, foot ulceration, thermal imaging,
Subjects: Engineering Measurements > Thermal
Divisions: Engineering
Identification number/DOI: 10.1088/1361-6579/ab36d7
Last Modified: 21 Jan 2020 15:15
URI: http://eprintspublications.npl.co.uk/id/eprint/8630

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item