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Determination of acoustic cavitation probabilities and thresholds using a single focused transducer to induce and detect acoustic cavitation events: I. Method and terminology

Haller, J; Wilkens, V; Shaw, A (2018) Determination of acoustic cavitation probabilities and thresholds using a single focused transducer to induce and detect acoustic cavitation events: I. Method and terminology. Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, 44 (2). pp. 377-396.

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Abstract

In this paper a method to determine cavitation probabilities in tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) is described that uses a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer both for inducing and detecting the cavitation events. The method has been evaluated by studying cavitation probabilities in Agar-based TMMs with and without scatterers and for different sonication modes like continuous wave, single pulses (microseconds to milliseconds) and burst signals. Cavitation thresholds (defined here as the peak rarefactional in situ pressure at which the cavitation probability reaches 50 %) at a frequency of 1.06 MHz were observed between 1.1 MPa (for 1 s continuous wave sonication) and 4.6 MPa (for 1 s burst signal with 25 cycles burst length and 10 ms pulse repetition timeburst period) in a 3 % (by weight) Agar phantom without scatterers.
This paper describes the method and its evaluation as well as giving general terminology useful for standardizing the description of insonation conditions and comparing results. In an accompanying second paperA future related paper will make use of the , the presented method is used to systematically study the cavitation thresholds in the same material for a range of sonication modes.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: cavitation threshold, Agar phantom, HIFU
Subjects: Acoustics > Ultrasound
Divisions: Chemical, Medical & Environmental Science
Identification number/DOI: 10.1016/j.ultrsmedbio.2017.08.1946
Last Modified: 18 Apr 2018 10:28
URI: http://eprintspublications.npl.co.uk/id/eprint/7846

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